Posts Tagged 'science writers'

Coffee, black holes, editors, and beer: the science-writing life

I was invited to give a short talk at the American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee, Florida last week, along with a few other astronomy/physics people who are now working outside of academic science. Thanks to the American Institute of Physics and Kelly Holley-Bockelmann for making this session happen, and to everyone who came to see us present.

Since a lot of people couldn’t see my talk (either ’cause they weren’t at the meeting, had to leave before Friday, or had a conflicting session), I promised I would post my slides. Since I obviously need more work to do, here’s a version of the whole talk! And yeah, it’s long, but it’s hard to turn a 25-minute talk into text and keep it short. I hope you enjoy it, and if imagine me prancing in front of the crowd while saying all this, you didn’t miss a thing by not attending my presentation. (And if you prefer the short summary version, see this post from Astrobites and search for my name.)

Continue reading ‘Coffee, black holes, editors, and beer: the science-writing life’


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  • @JoshRosenau also true 10 minutes ago
  • The first draft is just over 16,000 words, which I guess makes it a "novelette"? depends on where you draw the lines 41 minutes ago
  • OK, 2/3rds done with editing "The Stone Child", then some hapless victims...er, test readers will get a chance to look at it 46 minutes ago
  • RT @SICKOFWOLVES: SOME PEOPLE SAY THAT EVERY DAY IN QUARANTINE IS THE SAME BUT THAT'S NOT TRUE, WE ARE ALL ALSO AGING 1 hour ago
  • this story is named "The Stone Child" for the monster in it. The horror comic I'm pitching has a much, much creepier monster in it. 1 hour ago

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