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Thursday, Before the Journey

Image taken from Moon orbit by the Apollo 8 astronauts. Click for more pictures, via Dave Mosher.

I go for weeks without anything in particular on my calendar. Today, ironically, I have three things happening in DC, starting mid-afternoon: a NASA Tweetup at the headquarters building (featuring astronauts from the final Shuttle mission), a DC science writers tweetup, and ThirstDC.

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4 Responses to “Thursday, Before the Journey”


  1. 1 Carrie Fitzgerald October 13, 2011 at 09:28

    Wish I could join in for the ThirstDC and the tweet up at the science club! The ThirstDC thing sounds fabulous. I teach Thursday nights this semester, but hope to meet you at one of these events after December. :)

    • 2 Matthew R. Francis October 13, 2011 at 09:33

      Yeah, all the events seem to be on Thursdays. I think the next DC Science Tweetup will be on a Friday, though I’ll have to miss that one (for my brother’s wedding, so it’s a little bit more important).

  2. 3 Robert L. Oldershaw October 13, 2011 at 11:52

    Regarding Alice Bell’s call for scientists to stand up for the environment and against the short-term-profits crowd, I offer the following.

    The Alberta Tar Sands fiasco, a veritable Dante’s inferno on Earth, and the cross-USA pipeline that TransCanada is trying to bribe our government into allowing, should represent a line in the sand for scientists who care about the future of this planet.

    I note that a group of Nobel-prize winners and well-known scientists have taken a firm stand against this grotesque environmental abuse.

    Perhaps this issue could be an archetypal contribution of scientists to the “Occupy Wall Street” movement that is calling for reason and fairness over greed and plutocracy.

    Just a thought.

    RLO

    • 4 Matthew R. Francis October 14, 2011 at 11:34

      It may be two sides of the same coin. When a Nobel laureate signs a statement of support, it’s lending the weight of their scientific accomplishment to a venture; when a scientist (Nobel laureate or not) writes about ocean acidification, or the struggles of arctic species to survive, or what have you, they’re lending their humanity.


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